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20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
the taxes on 98% of the american people to go up. >> richard wolf, you are in washington d.c., the capital of incompetent this morning. >> yeah. >> senator reid used a phrase that has nothing to do with being a republican or democrat at this stage, i don't think, for a lot of people. the phrase he used is the american people don't understand blah, blah, blah what's going on. the american people i would submit don't understand how these people cannot do their jobs that they're elected to. so i'm wondering what's your take on what's going on in washington? you're sitting in washington. >> right. the at least we have bipartisan agreement it's all nuts, right? everyone agrees this is ridiculous and in spite of what they say, they've been talking about it for months and years and there was ample talk about what a framework should be through the election, which wasn't that long ago. there's plenty of debate. to tie the two stories we have been talking wiabout together, there was a colin powerful doctrine that general schwartzkopf executed so well in the first gulf war. which was have an exit str
look -- whatever you think about his tax return, he's given substantial money to charity, he might want to talk about that today. i don't know what he's going to talk about. >> i heard what the secretary said yesterday about elites not paying taxes. are you comfortable with a lot of the talk that's been going on in the democratic primary and even at the democratic national convention that seemed to border on class warfare? when you yourself said, if america wants to be more competitive in the 21st century, we're going to have to lower corporate tax rates, if america's going to be more competitive in the 21st century, we'll have to look at how we make this country more competitive -- >> i think we should lower corporate tax rates, but i think it's worth pointing out that of the 33 countries and the oecd, the group of wealthier nations, only chile and mexico take a smaller percentage of their income in taxes than we do. it's worth pointing out that if you have a lot of money and you earn only capital gains, you pay 15%, which is radically lower than the rates that any other advanced socie
believes you shouldn't tax anyone right now. i would have supported plan "b." >> you know, that was senator kay bailey hutchison of texas. and i would not be surprised if she's been to a starbucks in the washington area this morning. because at starbucks, in the washington, d.c., area at each of the starbucks locations, they write on the cups, "come together." it's sort of an impetus to maybe get these bozos in the house and the senate to come together in the fiscal cliff. we're going to be talking about the starbucks effort a little later in the show. good morning, ladies and gentlemen. >> good morning. >> good morning. it's thursday, december 27th. i'm mike barnicle in for joe, mika and willie. joining the table, we have political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. >> hi. >> applause for sam. "fortune's" assistant managing editor, leigh gallagher. and the president of the council on foreign relations, author of "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order." and in washington, vice president and executive editor of msnb
the president talking about moving the top tax rate up to 39.6%. and i'm just wondering, is that as equitable an approach, when a lot of really rich guys and women look at that 39.6%. right now, i'm never going to pay that. >> yeah. >> or would it be better to raise the capital gains tax, say 15 to 25%? would that help with income disparity a bit more? >> well, that's why i suggest a minimum tax. because you're absolutely right. of the 400 highest incomes in 2009, which average $200 million a piece, a quarter of the people paid at a rate under 15% so the only way to get it that is to have a minimum tax. >> how many of those would you bet, if you had to make a bet, paid 39.6 -- >> none of them. they just don't. and six people who were in that $200 million category paid nothing at all. they were around these 47%. they were the moochers. and they paid zero. you know, the way they get at them is a minimum tax. and it's very simple to do. and it will only apply on incomes a million above and another level at 10 million. >> what's the minimum tax again? >> the minimum tax, i would guess, would be 3
of a bully pulpit for the president and for his position on taxes. but i think the biggest story of the year came at the end of the year in the past week or so which is the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown and i think the presidency now might be shaped by those events and those are the stories that both barnicle and andrea have chose n as the top story. would you agree this could be a signature for the second term? >> i to do. i do agree with that. i think the events of a few days ago in newtown, connecticut, will help shape a good portion of the president's second and final term in office. i think it gives us a huge impe it tus to changes in this country that had had taken too long to take hold. i think the presidency itself, i think the man himself was shaped and altered by these events, both as a parent and as a president. >> andrea? >> let me just say that joe califano in the aftermath for some calls to action has written about what lbj said to him right after robert kennedy was killed. lbj called in joe and the other top aides in white house and said, we have to act w
economic story from 2012? from the u.s. debt ceiling crisis to the debate over taxes, the recovering auto industry to fears over outsourcing. the economy was a huge driver of the conversation this year. and one of our most compelling discussions was with harvard business school professor, michael porter, whose new project aims to help american companies compete on the global stage. >> michael porter still teaches, he's, like, iconic. but i'm, like, a little person. he's a big deal. so now i'm at the table with him. >> professor. >> this is, like, wow! >> you wept to harvard business school? i would have never guessed. >> i know. >> keep it low. keep it low. >> not that there's anything wrong. not that there's anything wrong. >> yeah. very good to have you. >> on u.s. competitiveness, where do you come down on this? >> well, gosh, i hate to be -- >> you're going to be debbie downer, aren't you? >> -- off cycle, but this issue is actually way down the list in terms of the problems facing the american economy. harvard business school took on, about a year ago, a major initiative to really ta
this wall! >> read my lips -- no new taxes. >> he must not be only the envy of the world but the engine of our own renewal. >> all our equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >> welcome back to "morning joe." this hour we have an all-star panel to look at the most important lasting legacies of the past presidents. joining us at the table, executive editor at random house and pliltser prize-winning historian john meacham, best-selling presidential historian doris kearns goodwin, and ferris professor at princeton university and author about president eisenhower evan thomas. >> what a great way to start it because dwight eisenhower, you always see presidents rise, you see presidents fall, and over the past four, five, six seven years i have found myself going back and reading ambrose's "eisenhower" over and over again. talk about -- let's start with eisenhower right now, my favorite president. it may change after i read your biography. >> exactly. or after we hear from meacham. >> or hear that he would kick dogs instead of go golf. but talk
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)